Unveiling the deepest roots of the so-called prison crisis: discover Injustice.

DURING THE LAST two years, prisons in UK experienced the worst riots in decades. Shortage of staff, violence between inmates, high suicide rate amongst prisoners, overpopulation: prisoners are on the first line to experience the aftermaths of the so-called prison crisis. The documentary Injustice dives into the criminal justice system in UK with the intention of unveiling its deepest roots.
Conceived by an ex-convict named Unsound Robin, the movie was primarily intended to be a movie made by convicts, with convicts and for the convicts.
This first intent slightly shifted, but Unsound Robin’s conclusion remains unchanged: “look hard and you’ll see it’s not that prisons are in crisis, prisons are the crisis”.

Contacted by Prison Insider, he shares his thought about the process behind the movie. What it means to make a movie about prisons with prisoners. How every stone fit to the right place to make Injustice come to life.

Prison Insider will display here any forthcoming screenings, in UK or elsewhere. You can also visit the dedicated website for more details.

— Published on 21 February 2018.

Injustice: a film about crime and prison - Trailer 4
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Injustice: a film about crime and prison - Trailer 3
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Injustice: a film about crime and prison - Trailer 2
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Injustice: a film about crime and prison - Trailer 1
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This is the fourth trailer for the documentary, Injustice. OUT NOW and screening across the UK. Check reviews, screenings, feedback and press here: www.injustice-film.com A film by Unsound Robin. Produced by Anthony Killick, Charlotte Sexauer.
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This is the third trailer for the forthcoming documentary, Injustice. A film by Unsound Robin. Produced by Anthony Killick, Charlotte Sexauer. Visit our website for more info and insightful blogs about film making, the criminal justice system, and join the debate. All screenings are announced on our website: www.injustice-film.com/screenings.
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Caption
This is the second trailer for the forthcoming documentary, Injustice. A film by Unsound Robin. Produced by Anthony Killick, Charlotte Sexauer. Visit our website for more info and insightful blogs about film making, the criminal justice system, and join the debate. All screenings are announced on our website: www.injustice-film.com/screenings.
i
Caption
This is the preview trailer for the forthcoming documentary, Injustice. A film by Unsound Robin. Produced by Anthony Killick, Charlotte Sexauer. Visit our website for more info and insightful blogs about film making, the criminal justice system, and join the debate. All screenings are announced on our website: www.injustice-film.com/screenings.
Find in
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Injustice tells the story of us ghosts, it tells the story of the irreparably damaged criminal justice system in which it is the standards of justice that are criminal.

The world of convicts and prisons is a strange one

For all the rhetoric of privilege, social exclusion and marginalisation, there are few who are less privileged, more excluded or further marginalised that convicts.
I’d never wish conviction on anyone, but it has to be experienced to be believed. To have life stripped away while one’s heart is still beating is traumatic. The feeling of hopelessness is bad enough, to have no visible path to a visible future is painful, but it is that abandonment of the past that is most difficult. Its connection with the future is ruptured irreparably.

It is no wonder there’s a suicide every few days in English prisons, and an attempt every 4 hours. For my part suicide was avoided by the decision to make a film about it, Injustice.

It’s painful not to be, not to enjoy the taken-for-granteds of life such as saying, “Hi, I’m me”. Me is replaced by an act, that act is what you become. You can fight or die. I died and became a ghost.

Injustice tells the story of us ghosts, it tells the story of the irreparably damaged criminal justice system in which it is the standards of justice that are criminal.

It shines a light on the absurdity of a system in which harm is supposedly dealt with by further harm. It lifts the curtain on a system in which deprived children are punished for being poor, while the wealthy and powerful ensured that criminalisation was conceived as a weapon to batter the poor.

I was penniless, of no fixed abode and trying to work my way through a suspended prison sentence while conceiving of making a film, but how. I was alone. I’d cast off my corpse to embrace a ghostly existence. As any convict knows the only people who really get it, who accept and understand, are fellow convicts.

It was for this reason that my initial idea was to make a film by convicts, with convicts, and for convicts. And so the filming started with Gethin Jones, a wonderful man who’d spent many years in prison, and then a mate, Tommy, whose existence was a mirror image of Gethin’s.

I can’t express the hatred I had for non-convicts, the state, its functionaries, academics, talkers. Precious hypocrites. No matter the talk, there’s always something that betrays the infectious nature of bourgeois society.

Or maybe it’s just human being – in fundamental level humans conducts themselves to eject infections. It’s easy to point to us as that infection.

It wasn’t until a chance meeting with a former prison governor that the film took a turn. To saw I was shocked is an under-estimation – his take on prison was pretty much that of an abolitionist. He became the first speaker in the film, saying that after decades as a governor you learn two things – that most shouldn’t be in prison and that had it not been for circumstance, it could be you.

Then a prison inspector, then a prison guard, then campaigners, academics, all saying the same, and so the film took on a different form, with a different rhetorical value.

It was no longer the story of the suffering of prisoners, but now a fully fledged weapon against the criminal justice system that simply cannot be refuted.

So far it has screened the length and breadth of the UK, with audiences unable to object. In fact, the only thing that could pass as a criticism is “why not more.” Well I’m not one to shy away from critique, which is why work is now under way on the follow up, on women and the prison system. And the films won’t stop coming until the whole rotten system is pulled down.


Written by Unsound Robin, for Prison Insider

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Unsound Robin

convicted criminal, Director, Writer, Producer

Unsound Robin is a convicted criminal who made the film Injustice during his conviction and isolation from society. In his desperate state, he sought not to tell his story but the story of the thousands of people caught up in the injustice system.
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